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KCSMMHZ
Dec 6, 2012 2:30pm PST
on the environment. they hope to find ways to lower emissions worldwide. >> but there are deep divisions, and many expect there will not be any results from the talks, which and tomorrow. >> dw spoke earlier to the head of the u.n. environment program and we asked him if anything at all could come out of this conference. >> we still have to give you a days ago, and i believe there will be a number of outcomes. the green climate fund, the kyoto protocol extension -- these are fundamental building blocks of an international climate process, but ever since copenhagen, we are pursuing a search for a new framework for global climate cooperation, and doha in itself will not deliver that. we should also recognize that these conferences have not provided us with a single framework, but they have triggered all across the world immense initiatives in the direction of a low-carbon economy, and i think these are also a byproduct of this process, and we need to recognize them because they are part of building our ability to move towards a low-carbon future. nevertheless, doha should at a minimum enable us to k
KCSMMHZ
Dec 7, 2012 2:30pm PST
than expected. >> every month we waste makes protecting the environment more expensive and increases the problems for the people whose lives have already been adversely affected. we have no time to lose. >> even germany, considered a leader on environmental protection, has come under criticism. the mayan minister could not live up to his promise. environmental groups say it is largely down to chancellor angela merkel. >> merkel has not use her voice strongly enough, and that is why the situation in the eu is so critical. it is lacking a leader, and effects are being felt everywhere. >> climate experts warn that if emissions do not sink in the coming years, the consequences will be dire. a new climate treaty is due before 2020, but after events in doha, that is looking more unlikely than ever. >> as we saw in that report, the german environment minister is playing a key role in the climate talks. we asked if he thought there would be a breakthrough. >> first of all, we are in the middle of a very, very important and difficult negotiation process. i expect negotiations going on all day
KCSMMHZ
Dec 8, 2012 8:00am PST
and plastic bottles are all recycled. that's good for the environment, because incinerating them would generate harmful co2. organic waste is also important -- when it's returned to the soil as compost, it binds co2. these simple techniques help the university operate in a sustainable and climate-neutral way. >> if you want to become carbon neutral, something very important to look at when you are doing your carbon balances is: what kind of waste are you producing and what are you doing with it. >> about a quarter of costa rica's population lives in san josÉ. and only about 25 percent of the plastic bottles used here are recycled. a lot of waste ends up in the river. costa rica has ambitious environmental and climate protection goals, but there's still a long way to go. some students are their way to lomas de l'alegria, south of earth university, for some more hands on experience. they are going to build a simple biogas plant. most of the plant will be built out of used parts -- old buckets will be used to make large pipes. >> this works well in small communities. >> it's a way to bui
KCSMMHZ
Dec 5, 2012 2:30pm PST
, signs that drove him to do more to help the environment. >> giving the blessings to the people and healing that is not enough. i have to do more. the whole world is suffering from this climate crisis. >> he always carries holy water with him. he says it has stress-relieving properties, and that could be needed here. negotiators have come from all over the world. u.n. secretary general ban ki- moon is also here to push the talks forward. delegates were shown a bleak video portraying the terrible effects of climate change. few expect any breakthroughs here. instead, environmental groups put on a sarcastic performance, handing an award to the biggest contributors per-capita to climate change, new zealand, canada, and the u.s. 1 lebanese activist is one of the demonstrators. in his home country, climate protection is a side issue. conflict in the middle east and the civil war in syria take up the headlines. he wants to change that. >> if we take down a dictatorship to establish a democracy and i do not have a plan to live on, what shall i do with democracy? -- have a planet to live
KCSMMHZ
Dec 8, 2012 8:30am PST
legalized by a number of regions. even the spanish environment ministry is backing the move, hoping to see a rise in takings in national parks as a result of people buying hunting permits, but animal rights activists are far from happy, calling the horseback hunting savage. >> this is a story from spain about wild boars and a controversial method of hunting them. but it is also a story about a country in crisis and how one is sacrificed for the good of the other. this is a member of the old gentry. hunting has been in his family's blood for generations. he is helping revive the tradition of hunting wild boar on horseback with spears. the sport, known as pigsticking, was long banned, but he has legalize it again. as chairman of the pigsticking international club, he wants to use the hunt as a way to draw tourists to the region. hunters pay at least 5000 euros per team to take part, money the locals could really use, so he prays to god to save spain and give people jobs. >> in our region, this really could be a way out of the crisis. we hope to get customers from abroad interested in the hun
KCSMMHZ
Dec 10, 2012 2:00am PST
the environment and the climate, but to also improve their livelihoods. and that leaves an excellent taste in their mouths. >> and that's all we have time for on this edition of global 3000. thanks for watching and don't forget to tune in again in seven days time when we'll have more reports on global stories that matter. until then -- bye bye! captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--
KCSMMHZ
Dec 10, 2012 6:00am PST
in okinawa. >> translator: security environment is getting come olympic indicated so i believe our alliance is really important. >> reporter: noda worked to improve relations with u.s. continued as relation with china deteriorated. his government nationalized the senkaku islands in the east china sea. japan controls the territory. china and taiwan claim it. chinese ships enter japanese waters near the islands and chinese alleged anti-japan demonstrations. noda's key domestic policy issue was fiscal reform. he staked his career on hiking the consumption tax and reforming social security to chip away at japan's rising debt. the opposition liberal democrats and their allies helped him pass a package of bills after he promised to call a general election soon. but then noda added conditions. he wanted to enact legislation allowing the government to issue bonds defined as the current fiscal year's budget and he wanted to reform the electoral system. >> translator: if you agree to this condition i'm ready to dissolve the lower house on november 16th. please give your word to the people. >> reporte
KCSMMHZ
Dec 11, 2012 6:00am PST
that they didn't scrap it altogether. >> reporter: some artists are searching for an environment that gives them freedom to create whatever they want. an hour's drive from central beijing brings us to a village with lots of museums and studios. here 5,000 artists indulge their passions. among them is an actor. three years ago he began exposing society's shortcomings. in the summer the communist party congress was only a month away, so this actor staged a special performance. he called this the democratic election. the message? in this democracy we can't choose our leaders. he invited passers-by to watch the performance. on their ballots the 200 people who attended wrote the name of a candidate they would choose. but a month before the congress, the police came. like his cartoon about the party's total power, they took him away. they didn't release him until the end of october. china aims to be an artistic and cultural powerhouse, but he says the party's heavy hand smothers true artistic expression. >> translator: the government keeps saying it wants to nurture art, but what art are they talking
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8